~Toughbooktalk~ Rob - 630-300-8877

The largest Toughbook discussion site on the net!
It is currently Mon Feb 24, 2020 8:07 am

All times are UTC-06:00




Post new topic  Reply to topic  [ 7 posts ] 
Author Message
PostPosted: Sun Dec 20, 2015 1:46 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Fri Jan 18, 2013 11:35 am
Posts: 2972
from here https://billstclair.com/theclairefiles. ... steps.html


By Debra Ricketts and Claire WolfeOriginally published by Sierra Times

A terrible addiction grips the world. It invades the most respectable middle-class homes and offices. It causes untold havoc. Yet, in this era when enlightened people understand that even coffee drinking ("caffeine use disorder") can be a serious disability, this addiction goes unrecognized and untreated.


We speak of Microsoft addiction -- a dependency that costs its victims billions, first to buy the products to feed their habits, then in damage done by opportunistic viruses that prey on MS-weakened systems.

What is Microsoft addiction? It is hopeless dependence on a computer operating system that is more insecure than a junkie in a room full of narcs and more expensive than a hit of heroin. In the end, this addiction strips its users of all privacy and independence. This operating system is controlled by a ruthless multinational software cartel. Once you're caught in their .net like a drowning dolphin, Microsoft pushers know they can hook you on even more expensive software. Soon, you're mainlining the hard stuff … stuff like the infamous M$ Office XP -- a program that not only costs more than XTC or cocaine, but reports your activities to your pusher, and demands that you get permission to "reactivate" the software simply because you dare to make changes in your system.

The M$ message: We own your computer. We own you. And your little dog, too.

Until now, the future has looked bleak for the ordinary victim hooked on Microsoft. But today, thousands are breaking free -- and so can you! -- thanks to the 12-step program of Microsoft Anonymous.

Follow these steps and, though you may never be fully cured of Microsoft addiction, you will walk the road of recovery.

The 12 Steps to Microsoft Recovery

1. We admitted we were powerless over Microsoft -- that our privacy had become negligible.

Microsoft's licensing agreements let the software cartel bust into your computer at any time. Microsoft lets its friends in, too. Privacy groups have found hidden keys within Windows -- including one which may be for the exclusive use of the National Security Agency (NSA).

What Bill Gates doesn't do to you, some script kiddie will. There are more holes in Microsoft software than in a heroin addict's clammy gray flesh. Worms and viruses ooze through them like HIV through a dirty needle.

2. We came to believe that a different operating system could restore us to sanity.

Linux (especially the easy-to-install Mandrake 8.1 or Red Hat 7.2) can lift even the most hopeless Microsoft-head into a world of privacy and stability -- and do it right on the same PC that now shares your Microsoft habit with you.

Free your mind and body. Free your finances, too. Linux costs way less than your next hit of Windows. Some versions don't cost a thing.

3. We made a decision to turn our computer systems over to Tux as we understood him.

At first, we considered learning Urdu in order to read some of the manuals, but then decided to trust our instincts and that friendly Linux penguin.

Graphical "desktops" like KDE and Gnome, which come with Linux, comforted us with familiar point-and-click, drag-and-drop, pop-up menus, and other things to help us on our road to recovery. They even gave us "Redmond-style" graphical themes, helping us break our Windows habit like Antabuse helps a wavering alcoholic.

4. We made a searching and fearless inventory of our applications and data files.

We understood that recovering from our Microsoft addiction might mean reformatting some of our data, surrendering familiar programs, and finding Linux equivalents. Fortunately, many distributions (brands) of Linux come with full office suites, Web browsers, e-mail programs, and everything we needed to get us going -- all at no extra cost. Even the most vital applications of all -- games.

Many Linux applications, like StarOffice, can convert and share data freely with their M$ equivalents. (Bill Gates, watch us break your hold even while those with whom we share data remain hooked!)

5. We admitted to tech support, to ourselves, and to another Linux newbie the exact nature of our misgivings.

Before buying, we visited Linux Newbie.org and LinuxChix.org. We asked questions on their listservs about the Linux distributions other newcomers have tried and the pitfalls they'd encountered. Others in Microsoft recovery gave generously of their time and advice.

We asked experienced Linux gurus, too. But they mostly said things like "grep" and "tar -xvjf." We feared that "bunzip2" might be something dangerously kinky. We turned away when they asked about our boot sector partitions. (Some people just don't know when they're undermining the recovery process).

6. We were entirely ready to have Linux remove all those cookies, GUIDs, and trojan horses from our systems.

We prepared carefully for our first installation, had a good backup of our existing Windows system, and made sure that all our hardware was Linux compatible. We accepted that it wasn't always going to be easy, but that in the end it was going to free us from Microserfdom.

7. We humbly installed the operating system.

It turned out to be easier than we thought. Many Linux distributors now beckon weary Windows users with easy installation wizards and automatic hardware recognition -- the very temptations that first drove many of us into the clutches of Microsoft.

But some of us still chickened out and bought a computer with Linux already installed.

8. We made a list of all the software we used and became willing to use alternatives.


Some of us decided we needed a dual-boot system, with both Linux and Windows on it, because critical software was available only under Windows. But we resisted remaining Windows dependent.

We used Linux for a task any time we possibly could. The more we used Linux, the easier it became. The more we used Windows … well, when you find yourself insisting, "I can turn off Windows any time I want. Really I can" … you should be worried. Be very, very worried.

9. We downloaded alternative software where possible, but never a Microsoft product.

Linux isn't just for techies any more. But now that IBM, Hewlett-Packard, the NSA, and yes, even Microsoft, are getting on the Linux wagon, beware. We continue to avoid products from companies with a history of snooping into our computers and our e-mail.

When we became truly advanced in our paranoia, we even downloaded Tinfoil Hat Linux.

10. We continued to take personal inventory and when we were leaving security holes, promptly repaired them.

Linux, being open source, can be examined by any software engineer to make sure it has no hidden security holes -- unlike Microsoft, whose owners hide its code like Columbian drug traffickers hide their profits in Cayman Island banks.

Linux is harder for crackers to target. And if you're worried about another sort of cracker -- the government or corporate kind -- think about this. Those "key loggers" or keystroke monitoring programs? Virtually every one of them works only with Windows -- and against Windows users.

Still, we diligently research before installing upgrades, and we regularly read electronic privacy e-mail alerts.

11. We sought through user groups, books, whitepapers, and HOWTOS to improve our conscious knowledge of Linux, searching only for understanding and the power to improve data security, system stability, and personal freedom.

We told ourselves, "Even if the manual is written in an obscure French-Ecuadorian dialect of Swahili, it's worth the effort."

Increasingly, Web sites, books, and manuals for new users led us along our way. Listservs dedicated to our chosen distributions offered answers to our questions. We persevered, helped by those who'd gone before.

12. Having had a computational awakening as the result of these steps, we tried to carry this message to Window users and to practice these principles in all our affairs.

And that's what we're doing right now.

Sometimes, you have to hit bottom before you're ready for recovery. Remember us the next time your screen turns that funny blue color, and pressing CTRL-ALT-DEL for an hour only gives you blisters on your fingers. Remember us next time your data ends up in an FBI dossier. Remember us next time some 13-year-old called H@ckWit infects your Microsoft Outlook with a virus that converts your hard drive into strawberry Jell-o.

You will be among friends at Microsoft Anonymous.

_________________
Life will beat you into submission.


Top
   
PostPosted: Sun Dec 20, 2015 7:32 pm 
Offline

Joined: Sun Dec 07, 2014 2:39 pm
Posts: 61
Location: Around Kansas City
Every "Get Windows 10!" makes my Linux preference stronger.

Every time I have to stop Windows upgrading my wifes computer WITHOUT her permission, makes my Linux preference stronger.

They "upgraded" a friends computer to 10 completely surprising him, pissing him off, and guess what, making my preference for Linux stronger.

Every time I have to clean a friends computer of viruses and malware, it makes my Linux preference stronger.

And for a Star Wars reference, Microsoft --"the more you tighten your grip, the more star systems will slip through your fingers." ---sorry, I couldn't help it.

Yes, I like Linux, and everything Microsoft has tried in the last few years has pissed me off.

_________________
glitch

CF-19 Mk-1 / CF-M34 / CF-27 / CF-28 / CF-29 Mk-1 / CF-H1 Field/Health

“The soul is dyed the color of its thoughts. Think only on those things that are in line with your principles and can bear the light of day. The content of your character is your choice. Day by day, what you do is who you become. Your integrity is your destiny - it is the light that guides your way.” Heraclitus ~5 bc


Top
   
PostPosted: Sun Dec 20, 2015 11:13 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Tue Dec 21, 2010 12:51 pm
Posts: 1899
Location: Northeast Louisiana
Image

Yep, I don't like a lot of what they have done lately and they have lost a lot of fan base for it.

I still haven't gotten that deep into linux, the last time I really looked was when vista was out. I even kept up with the Mandriva releases. But right now I am looking at doing two new custom ISO's. One I call Vista 2.0 and Got to redo my mini 7 with updates and put touch screen support back in it. Looking at adding some updates and completely ripping Microsoft update and anything else like that out permanently from the installs. The reason I am looking at vista is some of the base code is like 7 and COA's are cheap, cheap, cheap. I got pissed at Ubuntu for making unity the default desktop, a lot of users did.

_________________
CF-28 MK2,Mk3 / CF-29 Mk3 / CF-30 MK2 / CF-25 Mk1 ATI / CF-19 MK3/Mk3/Mk5 / CF-U1 Mk1,Mk2 / CF-M34 Mk7/Mk3 / CF-17 Mk1 / CF-07
Voodoo Envy M355 / M360 / M515 / M780 / U703 / Voodoo Hexx / Voodoo Idol / Voodoo Rage F1 / Voodoo Rage F1 / Voodoo Rage F1 "signed case" / Voodoo Omen
Alienware M11x R1


Top
   
PostPosted: Mon Dec 21, 2015 10:46 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Tue Oct 13, 2015 3:19 am
Posts: 193
Location: Old Europe
the grass is always greener on the other side.

unix architecture has a lot to offer in terms of robustness and an almost zen-like simple-is-beautiful design philosophy.
linux used to be great in following the unix design principles, some distributions like debian and slackware still do for the most part.
the more mainstream linux becomes (anything, really), the more flaws are implemented to accomodate for the new user base.
(avahi, upnp, network manager, pulseaudio, dbus, systemd, even targeted advertisment in android and ubuntu...)

You will find minutes 22-30 of this discussion most enlightening.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZTdUmlGxVo0
The guy in the audience is Lennard Poettering, who actually himself comitted most of these design flaws for Redhat.

In my mind, I like to compare this phenomenon to asian food beeing adopted by westerners
first we get interested because it's supposed to be healthier, then we invent+add "fortune cookies" and ever so slowly evolve it into a frickin mc happy meal with chopsticks ;-)

best regards,
Karl


Attachments:
File comment: so... this really old microsoft anti-linux poster became kinda true .. in a rather ironic way ...
(it reads something like "an open system doesn't only bring benefits" in german)

msad.jpg
msad.jpg [ 79.59 KiB | Viewed 4378 times ]
Top
   
PostPosted: Mon Dec 21, 2015 1:08 pm 
Offline

Joined: Sun Dec 07, 2014 2:39 pm
Posts: 61
Location: Around Kansas City
Maybe it was this post, maybe I just had enough.

I just wiped/reset my 2 Windows laptops and put them up for sale. (Asus and Dell)

So if they sell I can get an ssd for my CF-H1! No Windows in my collection and
another Toughbook comes to life, win-win! :pbjt:

_________________
glitch

CF-19 Mk-1 / CF-M34 / CF-27 / CF-28 / CF-29 Mk-1 / CF-H1 Field/Health

“The soul is dyed the color of its thoughts. Think only on those things that are in line with your principles and can bear the light of day. The content of your character is your choice. Day by day, what you do is who you become. Your integrity is your destiny - it is the light that guides your way.” Heraclitus ~5 bc


Top
   
PostPosted: Mon Dec 21, 2015 2:07 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Tue Oct 13, 2015 3:19 am
Posts: 193
Location: Old Europe
BTW on Point 10 about keyloggers: All big commercial goverment trojans support Windows, Linux, Mac and then some.
E.g. Intel AMT/ME hardware and/or Gamma, FinFisher, HackingTeam etc pp software.

Also, keyloggers are so 90s. As SUN used to say "The Network Is The Computer":
Most enterprisy corporations I've worked with use a man-in-the-middle HTTPS proxy - for virus scanning and content blocking -, often deployed via WPAD (WebProxyAutodiscoveryProtocol).
That "encrypted webmail" - googlemail and others - one might have used from within that corporate wifi was most-likely readable for someone in IT,
even when using a BYOD Linux laptop/smartphone instead of the corporate desktop.
Some of these proxies can also alter the data passing through and e.g. inject malicious javascript into a website or even patch some malware into your next software upgrade download.
google foxacid to learn more about one extreme example, the nsa's infection proxy network


Top
   
PostPosted: Mon Dec 21, 2015 5:14 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Fri Jan 18, 2013 11:35 am
Posts: 2972
Great poster image Karl

_________________
Life will beat you into submission.


Top
   
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic  Reply to topic  [ 7 posts ] 

All times are UTC-06:00


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Limited